Christine Zecca

AIDING THE ENEMY WHEN THE  HIPPO IS LOOSE
2002

By Christine Van Camp Zecca  

$3,000

Medium: oil on stretched canvas

Futility of War Period Post 9/11 40” by 48”

Image of the three GIs offering water to a Vietcong is from Shooting Under Fire: the World of the War Photographer ed by Peter Howe. This shot was taken by Phillip Jones Griffiths/Magnum Photos.

The caption under the photo goes as follows: “The GIs had captured a Vietcong fighter, only to discover that his belly had been blown out. He had dropped his intestines into a little washing-up bowl that he probably got from some farmer’s wife, put the bowl over his wound, and wrapped a cloth around it to keep it in place. He kept fighting for two or three days like this; when he was captured, he was very thirsty, which often happens with a stomach wound. The Vietnamese interpreter said, ‘He’s Vietcong; let him drink the paddy water.’ And the GI on the left said, ‘Anybody who can fight like this for three days can drink out of my canteen any time.’ (West of Saigon, 1968)

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Hippo

The Hippo kills more humans than any other animal in Africa where it lives in the wild. It doesn’t need to do this to survive. It is not like a large cat that needs to hunt and kill for its food. It just kills in an impulsive rage. We now live in a time of rage brewing just under the skin. Pundits are endlessly trying to find rational excuses for adding more fuel to this fire. There is so much that is intolerable about us that the feint of heart (those who are in too much fear to look deep within themselves) prefer to blame it on the convenient other. The one that is less than human that we can close our hearts and souls to. But on occasion under extreme conditions one soul will recognize another and offer aid, even if it is to the enemy.

 


Contact Information:
Christine Zecca MA
E-mail ChristineZecca@mac.com
Telephone: 415.233.2623

Christine Zecca